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Finlux Press Reviews


Finlux


Here you'll find a range of TV related Finlux reviews for TVs which had been sent to experts to cast their eye on our latest kit. These Finlux TV reviews are taken from various sources and allow you to link to the full reviews.

Finlux 32F8030-T Test Winner (Best Budget TVs under £300) 5 Stars - What Hi-Fi Magazine

Finlux


"Great picture performance combines with the latest online features for an absolute bargain of a 32in HD TV"



Finlux 46S8030-T Review by TrustedReviews.com 8/10 Overall (9/10 Value, 8/10 Features)

You know the Finlux drill by now. Aside from the surprising flagship 42S9100-T we tested recently, the Vestel-owned brand seems to be doing quite-nicely-thank-you by selling remarkably cheap TVs to a cash-strapped UK marketplace direct through its own website. So it’s no surprise to find the Finlux model under the spotlight today, the 46S8030-T, delivering 46in of pictures, a Freeview HD tuner, edge LED lighting and even a degree of Smart TV functionality all for the princely sum of £550. Minus a penny.

Aesthetically it’s... OK. On the surface of things it does a respectable job of aping Samsung’s ‘crystal’ design of a couple of years ago with its shiny finish and transparent outer trim. Its slightly textured bezel looks pleasant too. But it feels a bit flimsy, and the bezel is unfashionably wide by today’s ultra-skinny standards.

Its connections are surprisingly uncompromised by the 46S8030T’s budget price, though. Especially pleasing is the appearance of four HDMIs, a pair of USB ports for playing back video, photo and music files or recording from the built-in tuner, and perhaps most surprising of all, built-in Wi-Fi courtesy of a provided USB dongle.

There’s also a LAN port if you’d rather go the hard-wired route, but with Wi-Fi available we don’t imagine many people wanting to do that.

Finlux has even gone so far as to include with the TV a free copy of the Nero MediaHome 4 Essentials to help you get your computer(s) networked to the TV. Though it’s a pity that this software only runs on Windows 7 and XP; there's no Mac support.

Operation of the TV is accomplished via a surprisingly good remote control complete with a spacious and mostly sensible lay out, along with some pleasant enough onscreen menus that combine large icons with clear text.

Features within the menus include a quartet of picture presets (Dynamic, Cinema, Game and Natural); low, medium, high and auto backlight adjustments; multi-level noise reduction circuitry; a multi-level dynamic contrast system; 100Hz processing; a basic colour temperature adjustment, and a trio of surprises on such a cheap TV, namely a skin tone adjuster, a simple Red-to-green colour shift sliding bar, and the ability to adjust the gain levels of the red, green and blue colour elements.

the 46S8030-T's pictures look pretty good. For instance, the screen delivers a strong sense of the sort of texturing, minute detail and film grain resolution that distinguishes HD from standard definition sources - especially as its 100Hz system helps keep resolution loss surprisingly low when showing moving objects.

Fair contrast Also better than usual by budget TV standards is the 46S8030-T's contrast performance, especially at the dark end of the spectrum. Its attempts at producing a credible black colour really aren't bad at all, even with the auto backlight deactivated. There's a shade of bluish grey hanging over dark scenes for sure, but it's nothing like as strong or overbearing as we would expect from a budget TV.

As well as helping dark scenes look notably more convincing than they normally do on cheap TVs, it also makes it easier to see the sort of subtle shadow details that stop the darkest parts of pictures on LCD TVs from looking like weird black holes.

HD Colours Colours look much better in HD than they do in standard def too, with more subtlety in their rendition and a wider range of believable tones. Though there's a slightly muted general tone, and you can still see that the range of colours the screen can produce is well below what you would hope to see from a more expensive 46in TV.

It has to be said that pictures lack a little brightness after they've been calibrated to produce the best contrast performance, but this isn't as bad a deal as it sounds, especially if you're able to watch in a dark or dimly-lit room.

The 46S8030-T is a far better performer for its money than you've any right to expect, and even its Smart TV features aren't completely half-baked. So all in all, this is another of Finlux's better moments.

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Finlux 42S9100-T Review by TrustedReviews.com 9/10 for Design & 8/10 3D Picture Quality

We thought we knew Finlux by now. We thought the once-Finnish brand (now owned by Turkish TV maker Vestel) was all about value; about serving up relatively lowly-featured sets designed to appeal to the many people out there who fancy a big new TV but don’t have the funds for something from one of the more established ‘household’ brands.

Then the Finlux 42S9100-T turned up. This hot-off-the-presses model is Finlux’s first serious stab at adding a ‘flagship’ TV to its range - even though while its £700 price is high by Finlux’s standards, it hardly looks expensive when compared with other 42-inch models. Especially as it ships with a free three year warranty.

So what is it about the Finlux 42S9100-T that makes it Finlux’s most ambitious TV to date? Quite a lot actually. For starters it boasts built-in passive 3D playback, backed up by the inclusion of no less than eight pairs of glasses.

Also standing out on the feature list is a built-in Freeview HD tuner (not something you can take for granted across Finlux’s range), 100Hz processing, DLNA network support, Wi-Fi via a supplied USB dongle, and access to Finlux’s online services which, as we’ll see later, have at least a couple of useful tricks up their sleeve.

The set’s connections are suitably numerous, too. There are four v1.4 HDMIs, while as well as the aforementioned USB Wi-Fi option there’s a LAN for hardwiring the set to your network, and a second USB port for either playing music, video and photo files from USB sticks or recording from the built-in tuner. There’s even a subwoofer line-out for boosting the set’s low frequency audio performance by adding an optional external bass speaker.

All this and we haven’t yet mentioned the most immediate sign of the Finlux 42S9100-T’s surprisingly lofty ambitions: it’s distinctly swanky design. For starters its bezel is remarkably slender; only a little over 1cm wide. Second, the tasteful black finish of the main bezel is offset very cutely by a gleaming chrome-like outer trim encasing each of the TV’s sides.

The set’s rear is fashionably slim too, and the set’s build quality feels impressively robust. To top it all off, the whole screen attaches to one of the cutest metal cross desktop stands we’ve seen. Put some tape over the Finlux logo and casual observers could easily imagine that the Finlux 42S9100-T was actually a new LG or Samsung TV.

To support its DLNA capabilities, the Finlux 42S9100-T ships with Nero’s MediaHome 4 PC software, and Finlux has even gone so far as to try and simplify using this relatively complicated TV by providing a startlingly stripped back second remote alongside the bigger, more button-laden standard one.

Firing up the Finlux 42S9100-T’s online features reveals a fairly basic-looking interface, comprising a single page of colourful but rather ‘standard def’ icons for accessing all the services currently on offer.

Highlights include the BBC iPlayer, CineTrailer, Facebook, Foreca, ITN, Twitter, Viewster, AutoZine, Digital bloom, DriveCast, ebay, a European Football Matches channel, YouTube, iConcerts, Joomeo, K&N, Meteonews.tv, pizza.co.uk, playin.tv, Footie Qualifiers 2014, Solitaire Club, Tunein Radio, Tunin.fm, and Picasa.

Obviously it’s a pity there aren’t more mainstream video platforms present, such as LoveFilm, Netflix and the ITV Player, especially given that the Finlux 42S9100-T’s flagship status. But we guess Finlux/Vestel simply doesn’t have the resources and industry punch to leverage as much content as the big-name TV brands. And even the content that is on offer still isn’t too shoddy given how much else the TV offers for its money.

Of course, having a swanky design and decent feature count is only part of a ‘flagship TV’ story. A top-end TV should also deliver the best picture quality a particular brand has to offer - which is quite an intriguing prospect given that Finlux regularly delivers picture performances that surpass the budget norm.

In 3D mode the Finlux 42S9100-T lives up to our hopes. The passive 3D strengths of practically zero crosstalk, no flicker, and impressive brightness and colour saturation levels are all strongly to the fore. There’s a really engaging, natural sense of depth to 3D images too, though the biggest surprise has to be how well the Finlux 42S9100-T handles motion in 3D mode. There’s practically no judder or loss of clarity over moving objects, be they shifting across or in and out of the 3D frame.

It’s also important to stress that while the Finlux 42S9100-T isn’t immune to the usual passive 3D flaws of visible horizontal picture artefacts, jagged edges and reduced resolution, they’re not a major problem - partly because of the relatively small size of the screen, and partly because the core image technology at the panel’s heart is pretty good.

Dark backgrounds lack a little depth thanks to a slight lack of contrast and shadow detail when the screen’s running in the relatively high-brightness mode best-suited to 3D playback. But overall 3D pictures are more than good enough to keep us smiling at the Finlux 42S9100-T’s price point.

The same is not true, sadly, of 2D pictures, for one key reason: Finlux’s shift to a very slim bezel design seems to have created some pretty obvious backlight flaws that become clear as soon as you take the 3D glasses off.

First, the deepest black levels we managed to get out of the Finlux 42S9100-T without removing uncomfortable amounts of brightness from pictures weren’t actually that deep. Very dark scenes exhibit a residual grey or sometimes slightly yellowish tone that stops them looking natural and immersive. The same issue also hides shadow detail in the darkest scenes, and can leave some dark colour tones looking a bit off-key.

Next, as we still often see from very thin edge LED TVs, dark scenes reveal that the backlighting isn’t very even. The edges of the picture look brighter than the rest, with a line of extra brightness visible around almost the entire border of the image. Plus there are a few places where the light intensity levels vary over a much bigger area. As ever, this sort of light inconsistency can prove seriously distracting during dark scenes (or when you’re watching a Cinemascope movie with black bars above and below), leaving you feeling like you’re trying to watch your film or TV show through an unwelcome filter.

Yet another layer of distraction comes into play if you attempt to use the Dynamic Backlight’s auto option in the TV’s bland but functional onscreen menus. This auto setting is too primitive with its workings, causing the picture’s brightness levels to jump around too often and too strongly. You can, at least, avoid this issue by leaving the Dynamic Backlight set to a static level. But doing this slightly reduces the image’s black level response.

The Finlux 42S9100-T’s various black level woes are made to look all the more unfortunate by the fact that when you’re not watching something dark, Finlux’s flagship TV actually performs rather well. For instance, HD images look extremely sharp and detailed, even when there’s a lot of motion to handle. This is certainly not something we would expect to see of any TV from a budget brand, even a flagship model.

In fact, if you’re watching a grainy source, such as the Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows Part II Blu-ray, the sharpness is almost too strong using the factory picture presets, leaving images looking gritty. Don't feel tempted to use the set’s noise reduction at these moments, though, or pictures will look softer and slightly laggy. Instead just nudge down the sharpness setting.

Colours are very respectable during bright scenes too, making full use of the screen’s high brightness levels to push forth a reasonably subtle and expansive palette. Even the set’s contrast looks more than proficient when you’re watching material with a mixture of light and dark.

Although the Finlux 42S9100-T’s issues with dark scenes prevent it from being a perfect gaming monitor, its sharpness, rich colours and brightness would have still made it a decent bet. Except for one thing. Our input lag tests measured a very high figure of around 100ms, which is enough to damage your performance with reaction-sensitive games. This reminds us that as with all passive 3D TVs, the Finlux 42S9100-T has an LG panel at its heart, as we’ve seen similar levels of delay from all of LG’s TVs this year too.

Sonically the Finlux 42S9100-T is par for the course where skinny TVs are concerned. There's perhaps a bit more volume than might have expected from a budget slim set, and dialogue generally remains reasonably intelligible. But things definitely start to sound harsh if turn action scenes loud thanks to a lack of true bass and treble extension.

Flat panel, flat sound is generally the way of things and the S9100-T doesn’t particularly buck that trend but it’s by far not the worst example we’ve heard and it’s certainly capable of going to quite loud volumes before distorting. There’s not very much in the way of bass kick but at least there is a subwoofer out, which if you are able to utilise, will make a big difference.

The Menus are well planned, easy to navigate and extremely responsive to the remote and the black and gold colour scheme is also quite attractive. The Menus are split in to 6 areas – Picture, Sound, Settings, Install and Retune, Channel List and Media Browser. As ever, we’ll concentrate on the main Picture functions particularly as Finlux has made such a good job of making the rest of the menu functions fairly self-explanatory and logically positioned.

The Finlux 42S9100-T offers a choice of 5 Picture Modes – Dynamic, Natural, Movie, Game and Sports – which we’ll measure for accuracy later on in the Test Section area of this review. There are, of course, all the usual ‘front-panel’ controls of Contrast, Brightness and Colour as well as options for Low, Medium, High and Auto for the Backlight intensity. There’s some ECO modes for either switching off the video signal or setting to a low energy mode.

Moving in to the Advanced Picture Settings and we have options for Dynamic Contrast, Colour Temp (Cool/Normal/Warm), Movie Sense, Film Mode, Skin Tone, Colour Shift and RGB Gain. We’ll go in to further detail on almost all of these in subsequent sections but we were very impressed that Finlux provides a split-screen demo of what Movie Sense does – it’s an interpolating feature, for those that hadn’t guessed, intended to improve motion performance.

The Finlux 42S9100-T has a fair stab at taking Finlux up to ‘the next level’ of the TV market. It certainly looks like a premium set, its got the 3D, multimedia playback and Smart TV features we’d expect of a premium set (even if the Smart TV ones are pretty limited in scope), and there are likable things about its picture quality too.

Rating: 3D Picture Quality 8/10, Design 9/10

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Finlux 42S9100-T Review by AVForums - Recommended!

"It was around the time of the London Olympics that we last saw a TV from re-emerging brand, Finlux, and they’ve clearly not been letting the grass grow under their feet in that time. With a number of new models just hitting the market, the 42S9100T presents us with our first opportunity to check out Finlux’s attempt at 3D as well as the chance to see if progress has been made in other areas. As well as carrying the 3D TV headline, the 9100T is an internet capable model with some potentially interesting content awaiting us. Browsing around some popular online retailers, at the current Finlux Direct price of £699, the 9100T is up against some pretty stiff competition in the shape of the Samsung UE40ES6300, the LG 42LM620T and Panasonic TX-L42ET5B to name a few so it will need to deliver in its key areas to stand a chance of survival. It’s certainly a fancy looking TV but we never judge a book by its cover. Will it be a ‘happy Finnish’? Let’s see.

Summary

It’s obvious where Finlux has looked for design ideas with the S 9100-T but who could blame them, particularly when even the big boys aren’t above a bit of mimicry. Besides which, they’ve managed to pull it off well and the 9100 looks very stylish as well as feeling well put together. We certainly can’t accuse Finlux of skimping on the accessories front, either, as included in the box are a wireless dongle, 8 pairs of 3D glasses and two remote controls; one of which is a pocket-sized basic model with the other of more conventional dimensions and functionality. Both get the job done and feel well conceived. The same could be said for the Finlux Menu systems, that are bright, snappy and easy to navigate.

Finlux haven’t made a great deal of progress with their online content but the two most popular Video on Demand services – BBC iPlayer and YouTube – both feature as well as Twitter, Facebook and Picasa. Media playback support isn’t the strongest and streaming seems hampered by a lack of processing grunt as the S9100 struggled to cope with even moderately sized file structures from a PC. Improvements in the calibration controls, albeit modest ones, meant we were able to extract pleasingly accurate colours from the Finlux and there’s also been a modification to the handling of 1080p24 content, meaning Blu-rays playback more faithfully than in previous generations. Elsewhere the handling of standard definition content is also good, with creditable scaling and commendable film cadence detection. Whilst it’s good to see the improvements in picture processing, Finlux/Vestel needs to look in to how they shut some of it down to make the Game mode more than a feature to stick on the spec sheet. Input lag was abominable and we’d advise gamers to look elsewhere.

The Finlux S9100-T is capable of producing reasonably convincing black levels, mainly down to the fact we could detect very little in the way of uneven screen uniformity. Shadow detail isn’t great and dynamic range is mediocre but colours hold up well off-axis and motion handling is reasonable. It’s with 3D content that the Finlux truly shines, producing bright, punchy and engaging images that are virtually crosstalk free and extremely comfortable to watch. We did notice some judder with 3D Blu-ray but nothing to seriously distract.

By virtue of its blend of style, value and pleasing picture performance, the Finlux S9100-T deserves to go on the must see list of any passive 3D fan. It’s not a watch-with-the-lights-off kind of TV and it’s one to avoid for gamers but as well as its extremely pleasing colour palette there’s excellent screen uniformity and generous viewing angles to sweeten the deal, making it an AVForums Recommended Award Winner.

Finlux have certainly pushed the boat out with the S9100-T in the looks department, even if its design is something of a hybrid of models from two well know Korean manufacturers. The chrome bezel certainly Looks Good and the four-footed stand has clearly taken inspiration by the firm where apple is off the menu in the canteen but since almost all the majors ‘borrow’ ideas from one another, you can’t blame Finlux for competing. Besides which, it is impressive looking and feels nicely engineered with a reassuring weight to the chassis and solid metal stand.

The S-9100T is suitably equipped in the connectivity department sporting 4 HDMI connections, 3 of which are facing outwards from the rear and one very close to the edge. There are also 2 RGB SCART terminals, a D-SUB PC connection, Component and Composite Video connections with accompanying L/R audio jacks, aerial socket and a LAN Port. Unusually, the S8070 provides an output that allows connection of an active sub-woofer and also, on the audio front, there's an S/PDIF digital audio out and completing the connections – and to the side – are two USB inputs and a CAM slot.

Finlux give the user two choices of remote control in the box, both of which are nicely constructed. The first is a conventional handset that’s somewhat reminiscent of the LG form and is similarly well conceived with a good amount of space between buttons. The second controller is more pocket-sized and features pretty much just the basic operations but a good idea for freeing up come coffee table/arm of chair space. Also in the box is a wireless USB dongle – we would have preferred for this to have been built in, but shouldn’t complain – and 8 pairs of 3D Glasses which we’ll discuss later on.

Flat panel, flat sound is generally the way of things and the S9100-T doesn’t particularly buck that trend but it’s by far not the worst example we’ve heard and it’s certainly capable of going to quite loud volumes before distorting. There’s not very much in the way of bass kick but at least there is a subwoofer out, which if you are able to utilise, will make a big difference.

The Menus are well planned, easy to navigate and extremely responsive to the remote and the black and gold colour scheme is also quite attractive. The Menus are split in to 6 areas – Picture, Sound, Settings, Install and Retune, Channel List and Media Browser. As ever, we’ll concentrate on the main Picture functions particularly as Finlux has made such a good job of making the rest of the menu functions fairly self-explanatory and logically positioned.

The Finlux 42S9100-T offers a choice of 5 Picture Modes – Dynamic, Natural, Movie, Game and Sports – which we’ll measure for accuracy later on in the Test Section area of this review. There are, of course, all the usual ‘front-panel’ controls of Contrast, Brightness and Colour as well as options for Low, Medium, High and Auto for the Backlight intensity. There’s some ECO modes for either switching off the video signal or setting to a low energy mode.

Moving in to the Advanced Picture Settings and we have options for Dynamic Contrast, Colour Temp (Cool/Normal/Warm), Movie Sense, Film Mode, Skin Tone, Colour Shift and RGB Gain. We’ll go in to further detail on almost all of these in subsequent sections but we were very impressed that Finlux provides a split-screen demo of what Movie Sense does – it’s an interpolating feature, for those that hadn’t guessed, intended to improve motion performance.

Of course with Finlux grabbing the 3D nettle there’s options for that in the Picture Menu with 3D Mode (Top/Bottom, Auto, Side by Side), Low Medium and High for the 2D to 3D Conversion, Left/Right swap to reverse the polarity for those experiencing uncomfortable viewing and 3D Depth Sense with a slider that runs from minus to plus 10.

Since we last looked in on Finlux’s online portal nothing much has changed and we were hoping to see a little more progress here. Compared to the established players, the Finlux online Smart portfolio is a little bit limited but, to be fair, there’s a decent selection of the ‘old guard’ with BBC iPlayer and YouTube for Video on Demand (VoD) and Facebook and Twitter apps for social networking junkies. There are also a couple of internet radio stations, the Twin Match game and Picassa to keep you occupied.

Whilst the S9100-T does allow for DLNA streaming as a client, we really struggled to get it to look lower than one folder in to our file structure on our Windows 7 PC, which is something we’ve encountered before and usually an indication the processor isn’t really up to the job. Unfortunately we couldn’t get MKV files to play either by streaming or via USB, which will be disappointing for some and general file support, especially for video, is lacking against some of the competition. The ability to record from the in-built tuner is present, when connected to a USB storage device, and the lay-out of the recordings options is very easy to follow. The fact that the tuner is Freeview HD capable is an obvious bonus.

Once tuned to our liking, or approaching that, the Finlux S9100-T managed to produce images that were very pleasing. We ran through a number of our favourite Blu-ray discs – The Dark Knight, No Country for Old Men, Titanic & Tangled – and the excellent colour tracking really shone through. Motion handling with Blu-rays was competent enough, although there is the odd frame skip that can momentarily distract. Thanks to the IPS panel, the accuracy of the colour palette was barely diminished when moving away from the centre of the screen, although black levels took a bit more of a hit and erred toward blue from front-on.

As we mentioned in the Test Results, scaling of standard definition signals was fairly accomplished and with stable detection of the PAL standard definition film cadences, to boot, the kids' DVD collections were handled with sympathy. Sports lovers might want to consider using the milder form of Finlux’s motion interpolating ‘Movie Sense’ processing although the trade-off of some artefacting around edges for slightly perceptually improved clarity in motion is a close call.

The S9100-T isn’t one you’d want to watch in a darkened room, dynamic range is fairly limited but black levels attain satisfactory status by virtue of a complete lack of clouding. Screen uniformity, in general, was good although we could see some of the panel array, behind the pictures – together with a touch of ‘dirty screen effect’ on fast pans with bright colours (and white) but instances were fairly fleeting and rare. Overall the Finux S9100-T brought more to the table than it took away and some minor alterations to the processing has brought dividends in some key areas. Good job engineers!

This reviewer makes no apologies for his preference for passive 3D technology. Try walking a mile in my shoes after sitting through 3 hours of a 3D presentation in active shutter eyewear. You wouldn’t get very far before falling over. Speaking of eyewear, Finlux provides 8 sets in the box with the S9100-T, which should be enough for most, and they are very good. In particular the lack of tint is most impressive and the fact they don’t block too much of the screen's light output is also a plus. For spectacle wearers the lenses could perhaps do with being a touch larger but we couldn’t fully confirm that, for obvious reasons.

With said 3D specs donned, we returned to some of our tried and trusted 3D discs as well as some side by side material recorded from the BBC. We’re very pleased to report the S9100-T lived up to the promise of the LG panel, delivering excellent depth and pop-out, where required, on Titanic and Avatar as well as accurate colours and decent motion performance. The colours did need a tweak in the Picture Menu and there is a certain jerkiness top motion with 3D Blu-ray, on occasion, but generally we found the presentation to be excellent with barely any crosstalk in evidence. Happy Feet 2 – our favourite crosstalk torture test – has rarely looked so good since it landed on the doormat."

Rating: Recommended!

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Finlux 46S6030-T Review by ITProPortal - 8/10

"One thing you can always expect from a Finlux TV is outstanding value for money, and a disbelieving gawp at the 46S6030-T’s price shows we’re in for more of the same. It’s a 46in, Full HD LED-backlit LCD TV with a Freeview HD tuner, which sells for an astonishingly low price of £500. Bells and whistles are few and far between – there’s no 3D support, for example, or Smart TV features – but if you’re looking for an affordable big-screen set for watching Blu-ray and hi-def telly, it looks like a tempting proposition.

The 46S6030-T is a surprisingly attractive TV for the money, sporting the fetching combination of a wood grain effect bezel and Perspex outer trim last seen on the 32F6030-T. That bezel is fairly thick, but the set itself is not – its slim 40mm depth makes wall-mounting a viable option.

The supplied stand matches the styling of the screen with a brushed black finish and Perspex outer edge. Sadly, it doesn’t pop into place like the 32F6030-T but screwing it on doesn’t take long.

Build quality is solid. The back panel is plasticky but there’s a satisfying heft when you pick it up. On the rear panel is a generous array of sockets, including four HDMI inputs. Three of these are found on the outward-facing rear panel, which could be a problem when wall-mounting, although Finlux has helpfully located the other one on the side.

You also get two old-school SCART inputs, VGA PC, component, RF aerial and analogue stereo inputs, plus subwoofer and optical digital audio outputs. An Ethernet port is provided, although with no smart TV features or DLNA streaming on board it’s merely a box-ticking exercise for Freeview HD.

Joining the fourth HDMI on the side are two USB ports, which is great news if you want to watch digital video files on the big screen – simply load them onto a USB stick and shove it in. The set also supports photo and music files, although anyone who listens to music through a flatpanel TV needs their head examined.The side line-up is completed by a Common Interface slot, composite video input and a headphone jack.

With no DLNA or Internet content to worry about, the set’s key feature is its ability to play media files from USB devices. The set’s format support is pretty good too. It played my WMV HD, MP4, AVI, MP3, WMA and WAV files with no problem, although with AVCHD files the picture is glitchy and it played my 1080p MKV movie with no sound. There’s no DivX support at all. All files are accessed from the straightforward Media Browser library, which lists files on the left and shows a preview screen on the right.

The other great thing about the USB connections is that you can hook up a hard-drive and record TV shows from the Freeview tuner. The single tuner means you can only record what you’re watching, but you can schedule recordings from the EPG. It also allows you to pause and rewind live TV.

Next up is 100Hz processing, which should help reduce judder and motion blur when watching sports or other fast-moving material.

The Freeview HD tuner provides four hi-def channels – BBC One HD, BBC HD, ITV1 HD and Channel 4 HD – alongside a wide range of SD and radio channels.

A dodgy operating system is usually one of the tell-tale signs of a cheap TV but that’s not the case here. Finlux has fashioned some good-looking onscreen menus and a remote that doesn’t pose too many problems. The main menu is a row of icons the runs across the middle of the screen, tinged in opulent shades of gold. It’s basic but far from ugly, illustrating each section with a simple icon – Picture, Sound, Settings, Install and Retune, Channel List and Media Browser.

Within the Picture menu you’ll find all the usual tweaks, while all the advanced stuff is tucked away in a separate menu. Here you’ll find Dynamic Contrast, Colour Temperature, Film Mode and RGB Gain settings, plus skin tone and colour shift sliders. The Movie Sense option is Finlux’s motion processing mode, and can be set to low, medium or high.

Fire up the Freeview EPG and it doesn’t get off to a great start, as the default view is a ‘now and next’. You have to press the yellow button to display the full timeline layout, which covers a two-hour period. There’s no mini live TV screen, but as a result it shows a whopping 10 channels at a time and has room at the bottom to show you all the shortcuts. Further disappointment comes with the onscreen information banner, which only shows now and next details and doesn’t show you the programme synopsis.

The remote has a rubbery texture that feels nice in the hand, plus the direction pad, programme and volume up/down keys are conveniently placed, although they’re a little too close to the direction pad, which meant I sometimes pressed the wrong key accidentally.

The playback buttons are a bit too high up too. But the buttons are large and firm, giving a satisfying click when pressed, and the clear labelling keeps confusion at bay. The set generally operates quickly, loading up digital text in a flash and moving the cursor around menus without any annoying delays.

Next, picture quality, and the 46S6030-T is by no means perfect, beset by flaws that are undoubtedly a symptom of the low price. But on the whole its pictures are much more impressive than they have any right to be for £500.

Let’s get the bad stuff out of the way. Like the other Finlux sets, the backlight isn’t uniform, which means you get pools of light along the edges of the screen – most notably within the black bars during movie playback. This results in a slightly patchy picture that loses punch in certain areas.

And while blacks are much deeper than expected, they have a bluish tinge. During Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring on Blu-ray, the Ringwraiths’ cloaks don’t have the menacing, impenetrable blackness we’re used to. Playing around with the backlight, brightness and contrast settings helps, but I couldn’t find a balance that truly satisfied.

It doesn’t help that the Auto Backlight mode, which adjusts the level according to the brightness of the scene, jumps around really obviously. There’s a part in The Fellowship of the Ring where Frodo follows Galadriel into a dimly-lit clearing and you can literally see the set’s backlight level rising and falling as it deals with the contrast of Galadriel’s shining aura against the murk of the surrounding woods. You can turn it off, but then the set lacks the flexibility to cope with such scenes.

The colour balance isn’t as natural-looking as I’d like, and facial shading lacks subtlety. But it’s the sort of stuff you’d only notice if you look hard – with my reviewer hat off I can imagine sitting back and being perfectly happy with the Finlux’s pictures. One last moan concerns standard-definition TV Freeview pictures, which are noisier and fuzzier than I’d like.

There are several positives to report. The 46S6030-T produces remarkably bright, punchy pictures with well-lit Blu-ray movies, plus hi-def channels from the tuner also look fabulous. This is backed up by good motion handling, with no judder and very little resolution loss with lots of fast movement in the picture.

Detail reproduction is excellent too – check the forest floor as Boromir meets his demise, which is strewn with crisply resolved leaves and twigs. And although there are problems with the backlight, dark scenes are still clear and easy to watch thanks to the decent contrast and shadow detail. For instance, during the Mines of Moria scene, you can make out the goblins scuttling up the pillars in the shadowy corners of the picture.

The 46S6030-T’s sound quality leaves a lot to be desired. With TV shows or movies, the frequency range is narrow, resulting in a horribly thin and compressed sound that quickly gets fatiguing with energetic soundtracks. There’s never been a better advert for buying a home cinema system or soundbar.

The 46S6030-T has its flaws, but its low price makes up for them. Brightly-lit Blu-ray movies and HD channels look vivid and sharp, while the 100Hz refresh rate makes motion look smoother than most budget sets. This is backed up by plentiful connections, a pleasant design, USB media playback and a good-looking menu system, all of which significantly bumps up its value factor."




Pro's:

  • Attractive design
  • Decent pictures
  • USB media support


Con's

  • Backlight and colour issues
  • Light on features
  • Sound


Rating: 8/10

Read Full Review

Finlux 40S8070-T Review by ITProPortal - 7/10

"The 40S8070-T is yet another aggressively priced TV to roll off the Finlux production line, but this one looks like particularly good value for money – and that’s saying something considering the bargains we’ve already seen from the Finnish brand.

Just £500 smackers gets you a 40in LED backlit LCD set equipped with integrated Freeview HD, 100Hz processing and, best of all, an impressive array of smart TV content – features you might not expect to find on such a modestly priced set. One of the reasons Finlux can offer sets like this at such low prices is that it sells them directly from its website.

Also impressive for the money is the set’s design. It’s certainly not the slimmest LED LCD set we’ve encountered, particularly when compared with paper-thin sets from some rivals, but on the plus side it’s significantly slimmer than a traditional LCD set.

The impressive part is the set’s attractive ‘frameless’ design and heavy, robust build quality. The screen and black bezel share a single flush surface, while the overlapping transparent trim around the edge adds further panache. There’s even a silver strip that runs along the top and sides that you can’t even see unless you look up close.

This certainly doesn’t look or feel like a TV costing just £500. The bottom left-hand corner plays host to a row of touch-sensitive controls that beep gently when pressed. The stand, which you have to attach yourself, features the same black finish with transparent trim and tops off the look nicely.

On the back is a panel of outward-facing sockets, which might cause logistical problems if you’re wall-mounting the set. Still, the selection is excellent. Most generous is the provision of four HDMI inputs (including one on the side), which some big-name brands can’t even manage. You also get two SCART inputs, Ethernet, component video, analogue stereo and PC VGA inputs, plus subwoofer and optical digital audio outputs for boosting the sound quality.

Joining the fourth HDMI on the side-mounted panel are a headphone jack, an AV input, a common interface slot and two USB ports. These can be used to connect USB storage and play media files or record TV programmes from the Freeview tuner. It also enables you to pause and rewind live TV, which is good news if you don’t own a proper PVR.

As mentioned you can connect the 40S8070-T to the Internet and access a wealth of content, while its DLNA certification lets you stream your own content from networked servers. But the remarkable thing is that you can access these features wirelessly using the supplied USB Wi-Fi dongle – incredibly generous at this price, given that brands like Sony and Panasonic charge top dollar for their dongles. Of course that gobbles up one of your USB ports but it’s worth it for the convenience of not having to bother with messy Ethernet cables.

The Internet portal offers a more generous content selection than you might expect (26 apps in total), but it’s not a case of quantity over quality – for starters, there’s BBC iPlayer, which is a must for any online portal, with YouTube, ITN, Twitter and Facebook being some the other well-known names.

These are backed up by Viewster, CineTrailer, eBay, TuneIn Radio and a brilliant app (if you’re a football fan, anyway) dedicated to the World Cup 2014 qualifiers, showing match highlights and information about upcoming games. Also here are a few games like Twin Match Ocean, Tactic 2 and Solitaire Club, which are great for a bit of simple time killing.

With its simple grid of app icons against a blue background, it lacks the pizzazz of portals like Smart Hub, and more catch-up TV and on-demand movie sites would be nice, but all in all it’s a valuable feature that has no right being found on such an affordable TV.

The DLNA feature works really well. Access the Media Browser and you can explore music, videos and photos on networked servers. Its video format support is fairly good, playing WMV, MP4, 3GP, AVI, XviD and MPEG-1, but AVCHD playback was glitchy and it played my 1080p MKV file without sound due to the lack of on-board DTS decoding. Music-wise it’s comfortable playing MP3, WMA and WAV, although listening to music through your TV is never ideal.

The set has another network-related trick up its sleeve. There’s an iPad/iPhone/iPod touch app that enables you to control the TV with those devices, as well as making on-screen typing much easier. There are even motion sensors that trigger functions by moving your device.

Rounding up the features are 100Hz processing, a decent range of picture tweaks including Skin Tone and colour shift settings, and a built-in Freeview HD tuner. 3D support is the only obvious omission, but at this price that might have been pushing it. If it’s 3D you want, try the 42F7080 or 42S9100-T.

Finlux’s onscreen presentation isn’t showy or clever, but nails it where it counts – namely usability. The main menu is a gold-coloured row of simple icons running across the middle of the screen. It’s simple and responsive, like all the best menus are.

The setup comprises straightforward lists. When adjusting the picture, it’s annoying that you have to press OK to select Contrast, for example, then go back to the picture menu to select another parameter – you can’t simply move up and down. Plug in the wireless dongle and setup is easy. The set detects it straight away and within the Network Settings menu you can scan for access points and enter your encryption key. There’s even a speed test should you need it.

The other menus are a mixed bag – the pleasant Media Browser menu breaks content down into digestible sections (music, video, photos, recorded TV) and plays back files with the relevant details on the right and a preview screen.

Watch the 40S8070-T without your analytical hat on and you’re likely to find its pictures very enjoyable. There’s an arresting brightness and punch that hooks you from the first viewing (once you’ve tempered the over-enthusiastic Dynamic mode, that is), which is particularly great in bright surroundings.

Freeview HD shows like The One Show or dazzling Blu-ray movies like Monsters Inc look solid and sharp. It lacks the finessed, microscopic presentation of detail and textures you’d get from pricier LED sets, but on the whole these images scream ‘high definition’.

What’s more, fast-moving objects are surprisingly free from motion blur, while detail generally holds steady when the camera moves. There’s some shimmer and a little detail loss here and there, but nothing that’ll make you switch off in disgust.

Hi-def colour reproduction – so often the Achilles' heel of budget TVs – is surprisingly assured too, particularly when dealing with bold tones. The loud primary colours of Rastamouse on BBC HD look deep enough to swim in and there’s scant evidence of banding on tonal blends. Oddly it looks artificial when watching standard definition, making skin tones look smeary and a little off kilter, but stick with HD and you’re onto a winner.

Slip The Fellowship of the Ring into the Blu-ray player, and there’s more good news to report. The movie’s gloomy Mines of Moria sequence is surprisingly easy to follow, thanks to the clear shadow detail, expansive contrast and minimal backlight leakage. There are a couple of distracting patches of light, but it’s not as serious as some other budget sets.

You’ll need to have a play with the presets and adjustments to find a balance that keeps detail visible without losing black definition (Natural or Cinema are best) but to be honest that’s not too difficult.

The 40S8070-T is far from a world-beater in terms of colour fidelity, blacks, backlight consistency and SD performance, but overall its pictures are much better than I expected for the money. With the right material, they’re bright, crisp, low on motion artefacts and solidly contrasted. And when you add this pleasing performance to the high-quality design and tasty feature list – which includes a free Wi-Fi dongle, generous Internet content, DLNA and USB functionality – this is a TV that should be filed under 'bargain'.








Pro's:

  • Good pictures and design for its price
  • Supplied Wi-Fi dongle
  • Web content and DLNA-certified


Con's

  • Poor sound quality
  • Some backlight and colour issues
  • Unnatural SD Freeview pictures


Rating: 7/10

Read Full Review


Finlux 42F7020-D Review by ITProPortal - 7/10

"Finlux is building a solid reputation as a purveyor of well-specced TVs with ridiculously low price tags. One of the ways it keeps its prices so wallet-friendly is by selling its sets directly to consumers through its website.

The Finlux 42F7020-D is particularly remarkable as it's a 42in passive 3D set with direct LED backlighting that sells for just £350 at the time of writing. There are even eight pairs of glasses in the box, which is incredible value in anyone's book

the set's design and construction are as good as you could hope for at this price. And it's not completely devoid of style either, boasting a tasteful gloss-black finish and some touch-sensitive buttons on the left hand side.

On the back is a healthy array of sockets. Most eye-catching are the four HDMI inputs, which comes as a nice surprise given that some sets costing a lot more only offer three. Three of these are outward-facing, with a fourth on the side. You'll also find two SCART inputs, component, PC VGA and analogue stereo inputs, subwoofer and coaxial digital audio outputs and an aerial input.

Joining the HDMI socket on the side are composite and analogue stereo inputs, a headphone jack, a Common Interface slot and two USB ports which allow you to play media files from flash drives and to hook up an external HDD for PVR recording functionality.

The 42F7020-D's basic spec is solid, but anyone looking for extra treats like network streaming, Internet content and Wi-Fi really need to look further up Finlux's range (the 40in 40S8070-T, for example, offers smart TV, DLNA and a Wi-Fi dongle for £50 more).

It does, however, offer 3D compatibility (albeit of the passive variety) and direct LED backlighting, which at this price are not to be sniffed at. As mentioned, Finlux throws eight pairs of passive 3D glasses in the box, which means you're not forking out a small fortune on glasses for all the family. Passive 3D is no match for the active system in terms of picture quality, but for a comfortable and cost-effective way of watching 3D movies and Sky 3D, it really can't be beaten. There's no 2D-to-3D conversion, however.

When you first fire it up, a First Time Installation procedure sets the onscreen language and tunes in the TV channels, which it carries out quickly.

The onscreen menu system has a PC monitor feel, but makes up for its lack of sophistication with its logical structure and crisp appearance.

The main menu is a banner that runs across the middle of the screen, housing six simple icons in bold colours. It's split into Picture, Sound, Settings, Install and Retune, Channel List and Media Browser – all self-explanatory stuff.

Picture and Sound are where you make all your AV tweaks, while Settings houses stuff like recording configuration, timers and conditional access options. The menus are basic lists, but text is legible and the cursor moves quickly.

The Media Browser breaks content down into Video, Photos, Music and Recordings, again using a row of purple and white icons against a black background. Select video, for example, and the files are listed on the left, with a preview screen and details about the file on the right. It's more functional than fancy but gets the job done.

Elsewhere, the EPG is a dour-looking affair with its black, white and grey colour scheme and lack of live TV, but it does its job well enough. The programme grid shows 11 channels at a time and the cursor skips between programmes quickly. There's also a long list of options at the bottom, each corresponding to a specific button on the remote, which lets you skip days, filter the grid, zoom in, search and record – all of which gives you plenty of flexibility.

The recording library looks similarly dull but the list is straightforward and it provides plenty of detail about each recording, as well as telling you how much space is left on the HDD. When watching TV you can press Info and bring up the onscreen banner, which shows now and next details for every channel.

The remote is possibly one of the longest I've ever encountered, which is occasionally problematic when it comes to reaching up to the playback keys at the very top. It also has a slightly cheap, plasticky feel, with flat clicky buttons.

But those things aside it's easy to use – the menu controls are placed on a bump in the middle to make them easy to find in the dark and all of the buttons have clear labels below them. There are dedicated buttons for activating 3D and accessing the Media Browser.

With Blu-ray discs, the 42F7020-D makes a good first impression with its surprisingly bright and punchy pictures. It takes some careful tweaking in the setup menu, particularly contrast and brightness as it's quite easy to lose punchiness if reduced too much, but with the backlight setting on medium and brightness around midway I found a satisfactory balance.

Even taking its obvious shortcomings into account, the Finlux 42F7020-D still feels like terrific value for money. Getting a 42in direct LED set with passive 3D and USB recording for just £350 is a boon in itself, but the fact that its pictures are actually quite impressive comes as a nice surprise. Sure, the lack of Freeview HD, limited format support and plasticky build quality are compromises, but if you want LED and 3D on a tight budget then the 42F7020-D is worth a punt."






Pro's:

  • Low price
  • USB recording
  • Decent 3D and 2D pictures


Con's

  • Plasticky build and backlight issues
  • Poor USB format support
  • No Freeview HD tuner


Rating: 7/10

Read Full Review


Finlux 46F6030-T Review by ITProPortal - 8/10

"One thing you can always expect from a Finlux TV is outstanding value for money, and a disbelieving gawp at the 46S6030-T’s price shows we’re in for more of the same. It’s a 46in, Full HD LED-backlit LCD TV with a Freeview HD tuner, which sells for an astonishingly low price of £500. Bells and whistles are few and far between – there’s no 3D support, for example, or Smart TV features – but if you’re looking for an affordable big-screen set for watching Blu-ray and hi-def telly, it looks like a tempting proposition.

With no DLNA or Internet content to worry about, the set’s key feature is its ability to play media files from USB devices. The set’s format support is pretty good too. It played my WMV HD, MP4, AVI, MP3, WMA and WAV files with no problem, although with AVCHD files the picture is glitchy and it played my 1080p MKV movie with no sound. There’s no DivX support at all. All files are accessed from the straightforward Media Browser library, which lists files on the left and shows a preview screen on the right. The other great thing about the USB connections is that you can hook up a hard-drive and record TV shows from the Freeview tuner. The single tuner means you can only record what you’re watching, but you can schedule recordings from the EPG. It also allows you to pause and rewind live TV.

The 46S6030-T has its flaws, but its low price makes up for them. Brightly-lit Blu-ray movies and HD channels look vivid and sharp, while the 100Hz refresh rate makes motion look smoother than most budget sets. This is backed up by plentiful connections, a pleasant design, USB media playback and a good-looking menu system, all of which significantly bumps up its value factor."

Pro's:

  • Attractive design
  • Decent pictures
  • USB media support


Con's

  • Backlight and colour issues
  • Light on features
  • Sound


Rating: 8/10

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Finlux 26F7030 Review by Trusted Reviews - Overall: 8/10 Value: 10/10

"Certainly if the surprisingly competent Finlux 26F7030 is anything to go by, the extraordinary rate with which Finlux keeps refreshing its TV ranges is increasingly starting to look indicative of a brand genuinely keen to keep offering buyers more quality as soon as it becomes available. And if that’s not an attitude worth praising here, we don’t know what is."

"Given our oft-stated belief that 3D always works best on a really big screen, it doesn’t seem likely that we’re going to get on well with the Finlux 26F7030. For despite sporting passive 3D technology and shipping with four pairs of 3D glasses, its 16:9-ratio screen is only 26-inches across, the smallest 3D TV we've ever tested.

In short, then, while we’re not sure we could imagine settling down to watch Avatar in 3D on the Finlux 26F7030, a bit of 3D Gran Turismo 5 could definitely be on the cards. Assuming the set’s 3D efforts are actually watchable, that is - something that has to be in doubt given that the Finlux 26F7030 can be yours for just £240.

Even by Finlux’s routinely ‘high value’ approach to TV the price of the Finlux 26F7030 looks incredibly cheap. You’d normally struggle to find a ‘normal’ 26-inch TV for so little money, never mind one that also carries 3D.

The presumption has to be that in order to make such a price possible, Finlux has seriously had to scrimp and save elsewhere. But actually, while it’s not going to break any feature list records, the Finlux 26F7030 has got more going on than we might have anticipated.

The Finlux 26F7030' design, for instance, is illuminated by a pleasingly textured finish to the bezel, and the surprising slimness of the set’s rear. Its bezel is quite wide by modern standards, but overall the Finlux 26F7030 can’t really be accused of looking as cheap as it is.

The Finlux 26F7030’s thin rear proves right away that it uses edge LED illumination rather than the old-school CCFL system we might have expected to find on such a cheap TV.

Connections are solid. There are two HDMIs, an RF tuner input, a D-Sub PC port and a USB input. And to our surprise this USB port can be used for both playing a few video, photo and music file formats into the TV, and for recording from the built-in Freeview tuner to USB flash and hard drives. Impressive.

The Freeview tuner is not a HD version, unfortunately, but while we would normally be very disappointed by this, it’s not such a painful loss to us on a 26-inch TV as it would be on a larger screen.

Given that its 3D abilities definitely give the Finlux 26F7030 its ‘headline’, lets kick off by looking at how effective they are. And the short answer is that they’re quite a bit better than expected.

For starters, they’re surprisingly colourful and punchy, and look quite sharp too. Also, the screen’s small nature hides the traditional passive shortcomings of horizontal line structure and jagged edges. And as usual pictures prove more relaxing over longer viewing/gaming sessions than most active 3D ones, too.

The TV’s sense of 3D depth is fair (though as predicted, the smallness of the screen rather reduces that depth’s impact). Even motion doesn’t look nearly as juddery as expected considering how little picture processing the Finlux 26F7030 has".


Pro's:

  • Incredibly cheap for what it offers
  • Fair 3D and 2D performance
  • Playback from and recording to USB devices


Con's

  • Poor sound quality
  • Very limited viewing angle
  • Average black level response


Rating: 8/10

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The Independent, The 50 Best home entertainment systems - Finlux 46S6030-T

"Any way you look at it, this 46in TV is a bargain. The picture isn't bad, the sound is solid, the contrast levels largely impressive and the inclusion of a Freeview HD tuner is a bonus."



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Finlux 46S6030-T Review by AVForum.com

The Finlux 46S6030-T is certainly priced very attractively. For just over of £550, you can have a 46inch TV plonked in your living room, or wherever it will fit for that matter, and that really isn't a lot of money for a decent amount of screen real estate.

recommended



The Finlux 46S6030-T is attractively styled in a very ‘Samsungesque’ way. The matte black bezel is fairly slender and is surrounded by the transparent strip popularised by the Korean’s. The supplied base stand doesn’t swivel and looks and feels rather cheap, however, and we’d have preferred the remote control to be of more manageable proportions. Connections-wise, we were very pleased to see the 6030 sports 4 HDMI ports amongst its inputs, making a mockery of recent models from Samsung and Panasonic that have been skimping on that front. The menu system’s gold and black colour scheme is quite unusual but we liked it and it’s also very well structured and responsive to the commands of the remote. The menus don’t contain a lot in the way of smart features, with just USB PVR recording and (quite limited) Media file playback via attached storage but this is a 46” TV costing less than £550, so we shouldn’t expect too much and, besides, you’ve probably got something you can plug in to it that can give you pretty much the same functionalities the various smart platforms provide.

When you consider the rather accommodating pricing of the Finlux 46S6030-T, it’s actually very impressive that it can achieve such accomplished pictures



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Finlux 40S8070-T Review by AVForum.com

The model we have for review is the Finlux 40S8070-T Full HD LED LCD TV with a Freeview HD tuner and full UK specifications. Also available is the Finlux 46S8070-T Full HD LED LCD TV which has not been reviewed here but should offer the same features and a similar performance.

Finlux may not be a name that springs to mind, for many, when it comes to considering their next TV and the fact that it exists at all, is thanks to a recent buy-out of the brand by Vestel. If you haven't heard of them, well they're a rather large Turkish electronics manufacturer who claim to be the World’s 3rd largest TV producer, with a 25% market share in the UK. Prior to that, as the name would suggest, the company’s operations were centred in Finland – where they were once under the wing of Nokia – and more recently the brand was owned by Hong Kong company Semi-Tech before slipping in to major difficulties with Norwegian outfit, Otrum Electronics, as the market transitioned from CRT to flat panel displays.

Now that the history is out of the way, what of the present? Finlux have decided to eschew the traditional retailer-led route to success and have instead decided to focus their efforts on selling online only, direct from their own website. This has the obvious advantage of cutting out the costs associated with using a middleman and allow Finlux to pass those savings on to consumers with televisions that are priced very attractively. Obviously one downside of this approach is the fact that consumers can’t get any hands-on time, in-store, before making a purchase so we’ll do our very best to bring you the full low-down here, making you as informed as is possible. Finlux are keen not to be grouped in with the ‘no-name’ supermarket brands and wish to be seen as a credible player in the consumer market, let’s see if their confidence is well placed with the flagship 40S8070-T model.

Summary

Any brand snobbery should really be set aside when considering the Finlux 40S8070-T. It's a well-built, stylishly designed television that comes armed with an array of excellent features that we know are being expanded by the manufacturer, as a priority. The S8070 also delivers some very impressive contrast and a pretty accurate colour palette. Video processing is solid and high definition pictures, in particular, will likely leave most very impressed. Were it not for an untameable green cast to the most accurate picture modes, owing to some very poor calibration controls, and quite a degree of clouding due to uneven dispersal of the backlight we would certainly have been looking at putting the Finlux S8070-T on the recommended list. As it is, at this price point, the S8070 is far from being considered a budget-entrant and thus goes toe to toe with the higher mid-ranges of the big boys where it just comes up short. It's close but not quite close enough, for us, although a very promising foundation on which to build.



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Finlux 40S8070-T Review by Trusted Reviews

"The Finlux 40S8070-T is the company's most assured stab yet at establishing itself as a serious presence in the UK TV world, delivering a winning combination of picture quality, features and, of course, value."

"First we want to doff our caps in the general direction of the Finlux 40S8070-T’s design. For while its bezel and rear are both a little chunkier than the current trend among more premium brands, the 40S8070-T is still a very attractive TV thanks to its ‘one-layer’ fascia and the rather appealing silver trim that wraps around the main black picture frame. Overall the set looks uncannily like Sony’s latest Monolithic designs, and that, in our opinion, is no bad thing."

"Connections continue the good news. The HDMI count is four - the same number found on even the latest flagship sets from the big AV names. There’s a LAN port for accessing the set’s online features, or else you can use a Wi-Fi dongle attached to one of the set’s two USB ports. Very impressively for such an affordable TV, the Wi-Fi dongle comes free with the TV, making us wonder why so many big TV brands in the past have forced you to pay as much as £100 extra for their Wi-Fi USB dongles."

"The LAN/Wi-Fi connections also allow you to stream in multimedia files from DLNA PCs, while the USB ports can play video, photo and music files or record from the built-in tuner. A tuner which, we’re pleased to say, is a Freeview HD one. The last connection to mention is the D-Sub PC port, which allows you to double the TV up as a computer monitor even if your PC doesn’t support HDMI output."

"Not surprisingly the Finlux 40S8070-T’s online content isn’t as prodigious or as classily-presented as that of the mainstream TV brands. But there’s still quite a bit more going on than we’d expected. Among the service highlights are the BBC iPlayer, Viewster, Twitter, Facebook, iConcerts, ITN News, Youtube, MyAlbum.com, and the TuneIn internet radio app. There are 27 apps available in total, with a little box at the bottom indicating that Picasa should soon be joining the available services."


Pro's:

  • Attractive design
  • Good all-round picture quality
  • Exceptionally good value


Con's

  • Minor backlight inconsistency
  • Rather thin sound
  • No pay per view or subscription online film options


Rating: 7/10

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Finlux 26F6030 Review by Trusted Reviews

"The 26F6030 is a great option for anyone in the market for an ultra-cheap second-room TV, and it confirms Finlux’s status as arguably the most reliable of the current die-hard budget brands."

"The Finlux 26F6030 is, as its name suggests, only 26in in size. And that’s not the only small thing about it, for its price tag reads just £199.99. A price that looks all the more appealing as it becomes apparent that the set isn’t quite as feature-light as you might expect."

"The 26F6030’s connectivity are a D-Sub PC port (which can never be considered a given on budget small-screen TVs) and a USB port through which you can both play video, photo and music multimedia files or record from the Freeview tuner to USB HDD. We wouldn’t have expected to find either of these features on such a cheap TV."

"The screen’s colour reproduction is especially pleasing. For instead of the overwrought, ‘PC-tuned’ tones so often seen at the 26F6030’s level of the market, you actually get an appealing combination of punchy, vivid tones and a natural palette that even holds good with skin tones - at least when watching HD."

"Playing a bit part in this impressive colour effort is the screen’s well-judged combination of brightness and contrast. So far as brightness is concerned, even if you avoid the slightly over-aggressive Dynamic picture preset images look punchy and bold, even in a light environment like a conservatory or kitchen. Yet watching dark scenes reveals that its brightness doesn’t prevent the 26F6030 from having a passable stab at producing an authentic black colour to sit opposite its punchy colours and bright whites."

"We’re pleased to report that our tests measured input lag on the 26F6030 at just 18ms on average, with a maximum of 33ms. This is an excellent result for gamers, as it means the screen should have practically no negative effect on their gaming skills."

26F6030 LED TV, 26-inch, HD 1080p with Built-in Freeview & PVR

Pro's:

  • Decent picture quality
  • Bargain price
  • Multimedia playback fair for the money


Con's

  • Plasticky finish
  • Feeble sound
  • No HD tuner


Rating: 7/10

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Finlux 32F6030-T Review by CNET

"The rock-bottom price and an otherwise impressive range of features...taking all of that into account, you're getting a lot for your money with this set".

"When working with HD feeds such as BBC One HD or movies on Freeview, pictures tend to look crisp and detailed".

"This set has one of the best line-ups of connections that we've seen on a 32-inch budget model. It has a very generous helping of four HDMI ports, with three of these mounted on the rear and one positioned on the left edge for easy access. The rear is also home to two full-sized Scart sockets, a set of component inputs, a VGA port and a digital audio output".



32F6030-T LED TV, 32-inch, HD 1080p & Built-in PVR & Freeview HD

Pro's:

  • Decent black levels
  • Sharp HD images
  • Good digital media support


Con's

  • Inconsistent colours on standard-definition channels
  • Some haloing due to the LED backlighting


Rating: 4/5

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Finlux 32F703 Review by CNET

"The 32-inch Finlux 32F703 may have a rock-bottom price tag, but despite a few niggles here and there, it's a good performer with both 2D and 3D content and represents very good value for money".

"It's cheap as chips, yet manages to offer pretty good picture quality for the money and decent 3D performance to boot. On that basis, I think it offers very good value for money.

32F703 LCD 3D TV, 32-inch, HD 1080p & Built-in PVR & Freeview

Pro's:

  • Good quality 2D pictures
  • Impressive 3D
  • Rock-bottom price


Con's

  • Some motion blur
  • No Freeview HD tuner
  • Judder appears in movies


Rating: 4/5

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Finlux 55S6040-M Review by TrustedReviews

"If you consider the Finlux 55S6040-M strictly in the context of the sort of big-screen TVs we tend to see at its aggressive price, it’s actually quite good. Certainly it doesn’t fall prey to the heinous shortage of black level and motion clarity that so routinely ruins cheap TVs from second and third-tier brands. Compared with the quality available from much more expensive 55in TVs, though, its flaws become numerous and obvious. So we guess it boils down to a classic case of how comfortably you are able to live with its shortcomings in return for getting such a large and often very decent screen for so little money.".

"It’s better connected - in some ways - than we might have expected too. For instance, there are four HDMIs when two or three would have been acceptable for the set’s money, and there are two USBs when we might frankly have anticipated none. Even better, these USBs can record video to USB HDDs from the TV’s Freeview tuner, and play video, photo and music files. Supported formats including MPEG 1 & 2, H.264 (in an MKV container), .avi files, .mp4 files (including Xvid), MP3s, JPEGs, and .bmp files.".

"For when you’re talking about a TV as large as 55in, we can definitely imagine an audience of fairly serious AV fans with Sky or Virgin boxes - or just looking for a respectable Blu-ray movie monitor - who just want to maximise the screen size they can on a tight budget. And for these people, saving £120 for a tuner they don’t need makes all kinds of big-screen sense.".

55S6040-M LED TV, 55-inch, HD 1080p, 100Hz, SRS Surround, Freeview & PVR

Pro's:

  • Very affordable
  • Surprisingly decent HD pictures
  • Straightforward to use


Con's

  • Some backlight inconsistency
  • No Freeview HD tuner
  • Standard def pictures not great


Rating: 7/10

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Finlux 47S7010 Review by CNET UK


"The 47-inch Finlux 47S7010 has a very attractive price and is not a bad 3D performer. It's also capable of delivering decent HD images".

"If you plug a USB drive or key into one of the set's ports, you can start using the PVR features. Recordings can be scheduled via the EPG or you can hit record while watching to immediately start saving the show to disc. These are then tagged with the title of the show, so you don't end up with obscurely named files as you do on some other budget sets with these features. This model supports chase play too, so you can watch the start of a show while the end is still recording and you can pause live TV".

"Budget models often skimp on the number of HDMI ports, but thankfully Finlux hasn't gone down this route. You get four HDMI ports, which is in keeping with what you'd expect to find on current 47-inchers from big name brands. Three of these inputs are positioned on the rear panel, while the fourth is on the side."

"The 47S7010 puts in a plucky performance. Treble is crisp rather than harsh, and dialogue in TV dramas and movies is clear and distinct. The sound isn't awash with bass, but there's enough low-end grunt, especially if you call the Dynamic Bass setting into play. Finlux has added a 5-band equaliser to the audio menu so you're given enough control over shaping the sound to your taste."

"There is a pseudo-surround mode, but I found that it muddied the audio and was best left switched off. Also, things don't sound quite as good when you start to push the volume up to higher levels. For the most part, the audio is better than a lot of budget sets I've used."

"This model uses passive rather than active 3D technology and comes with eight pairs of specs in the box. Its 3D performance with movies on Blu-ray is actually quite good. When you switch into 3D mode, the set automatically ups the backlight to its maximum setting to give images and colours more punch. In fact, colours tend to look more natural in 3D than they do with normal 2D viewing."

47S7010 LED 3D TV, 47-inch, HD 1080p, 2D-3D Upscaling, 100Hz, SRS Surround & Built-in PVR & Freeview

Pro's:

  • Decent passive 3D performance
  • Low price for such a large screen
  • Good range of ports


Con's

  • Motion blur and judder
  • Colours look wayward in standard definition
  • Contrast performance isn't good


Rating: 3/5

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Finlux 42F7010 Review by TechRadar

"Finlux has never made a more concerted bid to get a foothold in the UK TV marketplace than it is right now.".



"Finlux is currently offering visitors to its online shop a startlingly wide variety of TVs, covering both a comprehensive array of sizes all the way up to 55 inches, and a reasonably wide selection of features. Including 3D."

"donning the lightweight glasses causes only the most minor reduction in the brightness of the set's pictures. This in turn means you can still enjoy very vibrant and rich colour tones while watching 3D, rather than having to suffer the often significant drop off in colour punch you get with most active 3D TVs. The lack of any shuttering technology in the Finlux 42F7010's passive glasses also means you don't have to put up with any distracting and fatiguing flickering effects, even if you find yourself watching 3D in a very bright room.".



"FThe Finlux 42F7010 is a solid 2D performer. Pictures still enjoy the brightness and punch noted with 3D viewing, while HD sources look sharper than would normally be expected from such a cheap 42-inch TV."



"Also easier to spot in 2D mode is the Finlux 42F7010's surprisingly respectable black level performance. Sure, there's always a degree of greyness visible during dark scenes, but it's not bad at all by budget TV standards, and doesn't lead to too much shadow detail getting crushed out".



"On the evidence of the 42F7010, Finlux certainly can't be accused of lacking ambition. Combining multimedia playback and 3D support with a 42-inch TV going for under £450 is definitely a move that will have consumers and rival brands alike sitting up and taking notice".




Pro's:

  • Decent feature list
  • Solid 2D picture quality
  • Passable 3D picture
  • Plenty of connections


Con's

  • No Freeview HD tuner
  • Some ghosting with 3D
  • Limited viewing angle


Rating: 3/5

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Finlux 32H503 Review by TrustedReviews


"As people who have been knocking around in the AV world for far too long now, we can easily remember the days when you could find yourself coughing up as much as £1500 for a 32in CRT TV. So it’s actually quite hard to comprehend the Finlux 32H503: a 32in LCD TV that can be yours for just £228.99.".

Finlux’s entry-level 32in TV does have one or two tricks up its sleeves. The most useful of these centre around the USB port tucked away down its rear left side. For this can both play back video, music and photo files stored on USB-based memory devices, and record from the Freeview tuner to USB HDDs. Both of which can be classed as impressive tools on such a preposterously cheap TV.

Tucked away within its bright and colourful, if rather cheap-looking, onscreen menus, meanwhile, is an adjustable noise reduction feature; a quartet of backlight settings, including a reasonably clever ‘auto’ one; a sliding bar that lets you shift the colour between enhanced red and green saturations, and a ‘True Black’ option for the set’s HDMI ports that boosts the black level depth of HDMI sources.

32H503 LCD TV, 32-inch, HD 720p with Built-in Freeview & PVR

Pro's:

  • Amazingly cheap
  • PVR recording
  • HD pictures look OK


Con's

  • Absent shadow detail
  • Judder, especially with Blu-ray
  • No Freeview HD


Rating: 7/10

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